A Justice Primer: Discontinued as of December 10, 2015

Canon Press, publisher of A Justice Primer, has discontinued the book due to the plagiarism cited in my other post:

CANON PRESS STATEMENT:

Canon Press has investigated the charges of plagiarism and improper citation in A Justice Primer, and it is abundantly clear that the editor and co-author, Randy Booth, plagiarized material in multiple instances from a number of different sources. Such negligence and editorial incompetence is a gross breach of contract and obviously does not meet Canon Press’s publishing standards. As such, we have discontinued the book, effective immediately. Refer to the author statements below for more information. We would like to specifically thank Rachel Miller for bringing this to our attention so we could take the necessary steps to immediately correct such a serious error.

You can read the full statement here.

15 thoughts on “A Justice Primer: Discontinued as of December 10, 2015

  1. Barbara Roberts says:

    Canon Press made the right decision to pull that book. Well done Rachel for putting on the pressure and exposing the plagiarism.

    Justice brought about thru public exposure is wrongdoing on the internet is powerful! And Doug Wilson and his cronies know it; that’s why they try to crush it.

  2. NJ says:

    One of the commenters at Rod Dreher’s post here http://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/doug-wilson-serial-plagiarism/ brought up an issue that had occurred to me. In his statement, Randy Booth said:

    “As a pastor I was drawing on a wide range of materials and notes that I had collected over a number of years to use in sermons or lessons with no intention of publishing that material, thus citations were often missing in my old notes. Concerning the ‘definitions,’ I didn’t see the need to cite those sources. I have also been a student of Dr. Greg Bahnsen for over twenty-five years, and undoubtedly some of his material has found its way into sermons and Bible studies over the years, which were cut-and-pasted as I prepared for this book. Regarding the material taken from Paul Rose (2003) and Wayne Blank, I freely acknowledge that I originally collected their material but did not have it cited in my notes from years ago. This is a serious mistake on my part (not differentiating my own material from others in my research and study). While this was not intentional plagiarism on my part, nevertheless I clearly did use their words without proper citation and for this I publicly confess.”

    Some time ago I read an article on the Aquila Report about the widespread problem of plagiarism in pastors’ sermons. Whether it was use of direct quotes from celebrity pastors, recycled anecdotes made to sound like it was their own personal experience, copying somebody else’s sermon series, etc., the author was highlighting what he saw as a major ethical breach that has become all too common. I wonder if Booth has been one of those doing just that, and if he had done his due diligence back then, all this could have been avoided.

    • Terri Rice says:

      I commented on this at moscowid and I’ll comment again.

      Concerning the “old sermon” excuse, my son, 17, and third year in college said,
      “Uh, shouldn’t he have cited in his sermons too?”
      See, they still teach good honest stuff at secular colleges.

  3. NJ says:

    Terri, not if you believe Tim Bayly in his current post at the baylyblog. He has quite the apologia for pastors not citing every single one of their sources in sermons. Of course, Doug is one of his BFFs so I can’t say I’m surprised.

  4. NJ says:

    Well, now it’s looking like the remaining copies of A Justice Primer are supposedly going to be remaindered by the publisher, although as of this morning the price on Amazon has been knocked down by less than $2.00. Over at the moscowid.net blog, somebody going by MIKE left the following comment that has me intrigued.

    “Plagiarism followed by intentional distribution of plagiarised work subjects the perpetrator(s) to civil and criminal penalties. Selling the book like this, after admitting to plagiarism, sets them up for potentially serious legal trouble. My guess is that they’ve since contacted the plagiarism victims and offered them some kind of remuneration in exchange for publishing rights. If they haven’t, they’re banking on the kindness of strangers.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s